Educating with an ASD

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makuranososhi
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Educating with an ASD

Postby makuranososhi » Mon Nov 29, 2010 3:36 pm

When I taught most regularly, I did not know I was on the spectrum. I was just the odd instructor who wouldn't wear shoes and had a penchant for odd jackets and hats, standing on his toes, and generally being just enough different that I got their attention without being a distraction. Since I've learned about it, I've worked with a couple individuals on the spectrum... and it makes a difference in relating and understanding their reactions to various situations. I consider myself reasonably well-adapted; at least enough so that I can function in some public places without seeming distressed... but even so, I still feel the urges, the upset, the bewilderment - I just manage to mask it well.
M.

He thrusts his fists against the posts, but still insists he sees the ghosts.
From my heart and from my hand, why can't people understand my intentions?
Those who would sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.
http://autisocial.freeforums.org

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CelticRose
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Re: Educating with an ASD

Postby CelticRose » Wed Dec 01, 2010 2:59 am

makuranososhi wrote:I consider myself reasonably well-adapted; at least enough so that I can function in some public places without seeming distressed... but even so, I still feel the urges, the upset, the bewilderment - I just manage to mask it well.

Welcome to my life. :roll: I actually didn't realize how much social interaction was stressing me out until I got a job that allows me to stay at home most of the time.

My grandmother and aunt were teachers, and I probably would have become one myself if my ASD didn't get in the way. One of my teachers in high school gave me an opportunity to teach for one class period -- I was overwhelmed by the group very quickly. I've been given multiple assignments to train people at my various jobs, and I've found that I'm good at teaching people one on one, but throw just one more person into the mix and I have difficulties. I just can't deal with teaching to more than one learning style at a time. I also can't compensate for students who learn at different speeds.
Be who you are & say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter & those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss

I yam what I yam. - Popeye

Be yourself no matter what they say. - Sting

My blog: http://rainbowpincushion.blogspot.com/

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makuranososhi
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Re: Educating with an ASD

Postby makuranososhi » Wed Dec 01, 2010 9:11 pm

I can manage students who learn at different speeds - just don't tear up the schedule and take away my rehearsal time, because I have things scheduled down to the minute in order to maximize what we can achieve in that practice time. I don't do well in large classrooms, perhaps twenty at most, and the only reason I am able to cope is because I can wrap my head around the 'role' of a teacher and what is expected... even if I'm off-base in some cases. However, I have discovered that I have the most difficulty working with beginning groups than with more experienced ensembles. Being able to use the correct vocabulary and focus on fine details is much more within my scope than having to manually demonstrate and even form their hands to the correct playing positions, which tends to be where we start with young groups. When it came to private lessons, I've been able to accomplish some amazing things - working with one student, we learned an advanced, six timpani solo for his audition... in two weeks. The analysis, seeing the patterns in development, these are all incredibly valuable in being able to function as a teacher. But I get tired dealing with people, especially young children and parents, which is why I focus on writing/composing more than anything now.
M.

He thrusts his fists against the posts, but still insists he sees the ghosts.
From my heart and from my hand, why can't people understand my intentions?
Those who would sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.
http://autisocial.freeforums.org

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alin0s
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Re: Educating with an ASD

Postby alin0s » Wed Dec 08, 2010 10:32 pm

most of this dont fit my age group thus i dont have anything to contribute but ENSEMBLE!? you teach BAND!? wow thats one hard subject to teach :hail:
check out my website at http://www.alinssite.info

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makuranososhi
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Re: Educating with an ASD

Postby makuranososhi » Mon Jan 03, 2011 6:50 pm

alin0s wrote:most of this dont fit my age group thus i dont have anything to contribute but ENSEMBLE!? you teach BAND!? wow thats one hard subject to teach :hail:


Have taught concert band, marching band, and worked with the choral departments at various schools for over a decade; now, I primarily compose/arrange music and do the occasion clinic as asked. And it isn't any harder than another subject, I don't think... though it can be like herding cats at times. My job was always to figure out how each student learned; once that was figured out, then they could excel in my class or any other without as much work. Apparently, that isn't the most common approach taken by other teachers, but I found that it worked for me.


M.
M.

He thrusts his fists against the posts, but still insists he sees the ghosts.
From my heart and from my hand, why can't people understand my intentions?
Those who would sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.
http://autisocial.freeforums.org

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CelticRose
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Re: Educating with an ASD

Postby CelticRose » Tue Jan 04, 2011 2:34 am

makuranososhi wrote:My job was always to figure out how each student learned; once that was figured out, then they could excel in my class or any other without as much work. Apparently, that isn't the most common approach taken by other teachers, but I found that it worked for me.


M.

No, most teachers insist that there's only one way to do things, and if you find another way, then you're doing it wrong. :wall: For example, I'm sure you remember Dr. Bennett insisting upon counting as the only way to keep one's place. Well, I can't count and sing at the same time, no matter how hard I try. I would pay attention to the other parts and the accompaniment and watch the director like a hawk. And yet I could manage to sing difficult stuff like Britten and Ives -- without counting a single beat. :roll:
Be who you are & say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter & those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss

I yam what I yam. - Popeye

Be yourself no matter what they say. - Sting

My blog: http://rainbowpincushion.blogspot.com/

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makuranososhi
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Re: Educating with an ASD

Postby makuranososhi » Tue Jan 04, 2011 4:02 pm

Indeed - in fact, were you there for the Riu Riu Chiu (sp?) Christmas carols year? If so, I was the one playing tambourine, telling Dr. Bennett that his tempo was completely off and either I could follow him and sound drunk or he could follow me and be even, but we weren't going to compromise on this. *chuckle* While I know I am even more particular because I am a percussionist, Dr. B's tempo (or lack thereof) would be frustrating, but I can accept that he was going for an interpretation of expression that I had not seen or was not my first choice. I had one co-worker who could only teach things in the manner they were taught to him. To the extent that he even used the same examples and would become agitated if you asked him to show another way. But my approach started when I was very young. Since nothing worked for me "right out of the box" I guess I assumed that was the norm, so I've always tried to cater my instruction to the students. Some go and practice on their own, some I send in small groups, others I keep together to work specific tasks - I generally tried to have the group working on two-three problems at once, and fixing 3-7 aspects of each of those areas while doing so. My math teachers had similar issues with me when I was younger; when taking Algebra, it is a language that is 'native' in my brain and so I can generally work out two and three variable equations my head (or a couple scratched notes/placeholders) and give the answer, so my homework was a list of answers with nothing shown. When they tried to kick me out, I fought it and essentially passed the final mid-semester under observation to show I was capable and not cheating. The ending compromise was that I would show the work - every damn small step of arithmetic, even - on the first equation, then could write my list of answers on the back side of that sheet. I was stubborn, and even though I'm a very shy person, I am also capable of making my point... something that I had to do time and time again. (Like geometry class, where I broke the curve on tests but wouldn't do the homework since it didn't feel like 'math' but more perspective theory if I had to put a name on it.)
M.

He thrusts his fists against the posts, but still insists he sees the ghosts.
From my heart and from my hand, why can't people understand my intentions?
Those who would sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.
http://autisocial.freeforums.org

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CelticRose
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Re: Educating with an ASD

Postby CelticRose » Tue Jan 04, 2011 9:49 pm

makuranososhi wrote:Indeed - in fact, were you there for the Riu Riu Chiu (sp?) Christmas carols year? If so, I was the one playing tambourine, telling Dr. Bennett that his tempo was completely off and either I could follow him and sound drunk or he could follow me and be even, but we weren't going to compromise on this. *chuckle*

:lolfloor: Unfortunately I missed that one. I would love to sing Riu Riu Chiu -- I've only encountered it on one of my Christmas CDs.

My math teachers had similar issues with me when I was younger; when taking Algebra, it is a language that is 'native' in my brain and so I can generally work out two and three variable equations my head (or a couple scratched notes/placeholders) and give the answer, so my homework was a list of answers with nothing shown. When they tried to kick me out, I fought it and essentially passed the final mid-semester under observation to show I was capable and not cheating. The ending compromise was that I would show the work - every damn small step of arithmetic, even - on the first equation, then could write my list of answers on the back side of that sheet.

I had the same problem. Although I can't do math in my head (not even simple arithmetic), I'm very good at seeing several steps ahead in a process and skipping those steps, sometimes to the point of not being able to see the intermediate steps. Every so often I'd encounter a math teacher who insisted that I show every piddling little step. In high school chemistry, they even made us write down all the units (grams, hours, etc.) and cancel them out. :wall:

(Like geometry class, where I broke the curve on tests but wouldn't do the homework since it didn't feel like 'math' but more perspective theory if I had to put a name on it.)

I got a few failing grades for not doing homework even though I aced all the tests. With my near-photographic memory I just needed to pay attention in class to learn the material. I never studied, and I wouldn't do the homework because it was boring.
Be who you are & say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter & those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss

I yam what I yam. - Popeye

Be yourself no matter what they say. - Sting

My blog: http://rainbowpincushion.blogspot.com/


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