Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

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Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby alin0s » Fri May 22, 2009 11:25 pm

You know, think back to the days you were in school. If it was any time in the last decade (10 years) then you might recognize the PECS (Picture Exchange Communication System) cards hanging around a few peoples necks with severe non verbal autism. Honestly I kind of use my emoticons on the forum in the same way, especially when I am feelng unusually autistic :pills: maybe its from the Morphine I take for my pain issues. Whateva!

Any of you remember these Image from the school days?

I do, they are probably one of the hallmark memories from my days in school since I was often the one sitting there "talking" with my non verbal friends :bounce:

Do you feel emoticons on the forum are the same to you?

I do, very definitely... ESPECIALLY when I am on my Morphine :lolfloor: :pills:
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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby CelticRose » Fri May 22, 2009 11:32 pm

I never used those -- I was actually in the gifted classes rather than Special Ed. They look like really cool tools for non-verbal autistics, however.

I find that emoticons really help me to clarify my emotions and intentions when I'm posting -- particularly if I'm posting on an NT site. They really help to avoid misunderstandings.
Be who you are & say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter & those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss

I yam what I yam. - Popeye

Be yourself no matter what they say. - Sting

My blog: http://rainbowpincushion.blogspot.com/

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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby alin0s » Fri May 22, 2009 11:35 pm

CelticRose wrote:I never used those -- I was actually in the gifted classes rather than Special Ed. They look like really cool tools for non-verbal autistics, however.

I find that emoticons really help me to clarify my emotions and intentions when I'm posting -- particularly if I'm posting on an NT site. They really help to avoid misunderstandings.


I was always in the special education wing, never the gifted wing. The reason for this is because I have always been :flush: in the toilet about plain old academics or otherwise just wanting to :wall: :wall: :wall: because of the insanity in school. Honestly I do much better in my interests / obsessions than I will EVER do in plain academics. You can ask me to take a DVD Player apart down to its individual screws and me without having a technical manual will put it back together in working order. OR for more of a challenge you can mail me a DVD Player in a million pieces and watch me put it back in about a day or two. But ask me to do a simple math question and I will be banging my head on the wall for how bad I phail.
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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby CelticRose » Fri May 22, 2009 11:49 pm

alin0s wrote:
CelticRose wrote:I never used those -- I was actually in the gifted classes rather than Special Ed. They look like really cool tools for non-verbal autistics, however.

I find that emoticons really help me to clarify my emotions and intentions when I'm posting -- particularly if I'm posting on an NT site. They really help to avoid misunderstandings.


I was always in the special education wing, never the gifted wing. The reason for this is because I have always been :flush: in the toilet about plain old academics or otherwise just wanting to :wall: :wall: :wall: because of the insanity in school. Honestly I do much better in my interests / obsessions than I will EVER do in plain academics. You can ask me to take a DVD Player apart down to its individual screws and me without having a technical manual will put it back together in working order. OR for more of a challenge you can mail me a DVD Player in a million pieces and watch me put it back in about a day or two. But ask me to do a simple math question and I will be banging my head on the wall for how bad I phail.

Hmmm, yes. The bad old days before they figured out that people have different learning styles and that sometimes you have to accomodate that.

You're obviously kinesthetic, and schools are often geared toward visual and auditory learners. If you have a good memory, like I do, it's very easy to succeed in school. They also would insist that you do everything their way even if you found a better way that still acheived the right answer.

One thing I like about the school I work at is that they present the material in a variety of ways so that the students can learn the way that's easiest for them.
Be who you are & say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter & those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss

I yam what I yam. - Popeye

Be yourself no matter what they say. - Sting

My blog: http://rainbowpincushion.blogspot.com/

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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby alin0s » Fri May 22, 2009 11:55 pm

CelticRose wrote:
alin0s wrote:
CelticRose wrote:I never used those -- I was actually in the gifted classes rather than Special Ed. They look like really cool tools for non-verbal autistics, however.

I find that emoticons really help me to clarify my emotions and intentions when I'm posting -- particularly if I'm posting on an NT site. They really help to avoid misunderstandings.


I was always in the special education wing, never the gifted wing. The reason for this is because I have always been :flush: in the toilet about plain old academics or otherwise just wanting to :wall: :wall: :wall: because of the insanity in school. Honestly I do much better in my interests / obsessions than I will EVER do in plain academics. You can ask me to take a DVD Player apart down to its individual screws and me without having a technical manual will put it back together in working order. OR for more of a challenge you can mail me a DVD Player in a million pieces and watch me put it back in about a day or two. But ask me to do a simple math question and I will be banging my head on the wall for how bad I phail.

Hmmm, yes. The bad old days before they figured out that people have different learning styles and that sometimes you have to accomodate that.

You're obviously kinesthetic, and schools are often geared toward visual and auditory learners. If you have a good memory, like I do, it's very easy to succeed in school. They also would insist that you do everything their way even if you found a better way that still acheived the right answer.

One thing I like about the school I work at is that they present the material in a variety of ways so that the students can learn the way that's easiest for them.


Definitely. I heavily learn physically by touching and messing with things, it was obviously seen in my autism test yesterday and the "Towers of Hanoi" test

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_of_Hanoi A very challenging puzzle but since I was able to actually TOUCH it and feel the results in my hands I was able to solve all of them except the last and hardest combination, solving it 30 seconds after the clock buzzed. But when it comes to jigzaw puzzles, forget about it.

I have pretty bad memory depending on what you are asking me, if it has to do with my obsessions or something short term (within 5 minutes) I am pretty ok. Seriously, don't even test me for my facial picture memory. I failed beyond failing on that portion of the test yesterday. I can't wait to get my results back and find out really how autistic I am. :bounce: :boogie: :bounce: :boogie: :bounce:

I failed a lot in school cause my mid term memory (1-5 days) Is pretty poor especially for academics due to LACK OF INTEREST
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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby CelticRose » Sun May 24, 2009 1:51 am

alin0s wrote:
CelticRose wrote:
alin0s wrote:
CelticRose wrote:I never used those -- I was actually in the gifted classes rather than Special Ed. They look like really cool tools for non-verbal autistics, however.

I find that emoticons really help me to clarify my emotions and intentions when I'm posting -- particularly if I'm posting on an NT site. They really help to avoid misunderstandings.


I was always in the special education wing, never the gifted wing. The reason for this is because I have always been :flush: in the toilet about plain old academics or otherwise just wanting to :wall: :wall: :wall: because of the insanity in school. Honestly I do much better in my interests / obsessions than I will EVER do in plain academics. You can ask me to take a DVD Player apart down to its individual screws and me without having a technical manual will put it back together in working order. OR for more of a challenge you can mail me a DVD Player in a million pieces and watch me put it back in about a day or two. But ask me to do a simple math question and I will be banging my head on the wall for how bad I phail.

Hmmm, yes. The bad old days before they figured out that people have different learning styles and that sometimes you have to accomodate that.

You're obviously kinesthetic, and schools are often geared toward visual and auditory learners. If you have a good memory, like I do, it's very easy to succeed in school. They also would insist that you do everything their way even if you found a better way that still acheived the right answer.

One thing I like about the school I work at is that they present the material in a variety of ways so that the students can learn the way that's easiest for them.


Definitely. I heavily learn physically by touching and messing with things, it was obviously seen in my autism test yesterday and the "Towers of Hanoi" test

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_of_Hanoi A very challenging puzzle but since I was able to actually TOUCH it and feel the results in my hands I was able to solve all of them except the last and hardest combination, solving it 30 seconds after the clock buzzed. But when it comes to jigzaw puzzles, forget about it.

I have pretty bad memory depending on what you are asking me, if it has to do with my obsessions or something short term (within 5 minutes) I am pretty ok. Seriously, don't even test me for my facial picture memory. I failed beyond failing on that portion of the test yesterday. I can't wait to get my results back and find out really how autistic I am. :bounce: :boogie: :bounce: :boogie: :bounce:

I failed a lot in school cause my mid term memory (1-5 days) Is pretty poor especially for academics due to LACK OF INTEREST

Well, you're smarter than me in this case! ;) I would never be able to do that puzzle -- too much advance planning. :lol: Now jigsaws I like -- I'm very visual.
Be who you are & say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter & those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss

I yam what I yam. - Popeye

Be yourself no matter what they say. - Sting

My blog: http://rainbowpincushion.blogspot.com/

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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby alin0s » Sun May 24, 2009 10:47 am

CelticRose wrote:
alin0s wrote:
CelticRose wrote:
alin0s wrote:
CelticRose wrote:I never used those -- I was actually in the gifted classes rather than Special Ed. They look like really cool tools for non-verbal autistics, however.

I find that emoticons really help me to clarify my emotions and intentions when I'm posting -- particularly if I'm posting on an NT site. They really help to avoid misunderstandings.


I was always in the special education wing, never the gifted wing. The reason for this is because I have always been :flush: in the toilet about plain old academics or otherwise just wanting to :wall: :wall: :wall: because of the insanity in school. Honestly I do much better in my interests / obsessions than I will EVER do in plain academics. You can ask me to take a DVD Player apart down to its individual screws and me without having a technical manual will put it back together in working order. OR for more of a challenge you can mail me a DVD Player in a million pieces and watch me put it back in about a day or two. But ask me to do a simple math question and I will be banging my head on the wall for how bad I phail.

Hmmm, yes. The bad old days before they figured out that people have different learning styles and that sometimes you have to accomodate that.

You're obviously kinesthetic, and schools are often geared toward visual and auditory learners. If you have a good memory, like I do, it's very easy to succeed in school. They also would insist that you do everything their way even if you found a better way that still acheived the right answer.

One thing I like about the school I work at is that they present the material in a variety of ways so that the students can learn the way that's easiest for them.


Definitely. I heavily learn physically by touching and messing with things, it was obviously seen in my autism test yesterday and the "Towers of Hanoi" test

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_of_Hanoi A very challenging puzzle but since I was able to actually TOUCH it and feel the results in my hands I was able to solve all of them except the last and hardest combination, solving it 30 seconds after the clock buzzed. But when it comes to jigzaw puzzles, forget about it.

I have pretty bad memory depending on what you are asking me, if it has to do with my obsessions or something short term (within 5 minutes) I am pretty ok. Seriously, don't even test me for my facial picture memory. I failed beyond failing on that portion of the test yesterday. I can't wait to get my results back and find out really how autistic I am. :bounce: :boogie: :bounce: :boogie: :bounce:

I failed a lot in school cause my mid term memory (1-5 days) Is pretty poor especially for academics due to LACK OF INTEREST

Well, you're smarter than me in this case! ;) I would never be able to do that puzzle -- too much advance planning. :lol: Now jigsaws I like -- I'm very visual.


I did not do it well by planning it, I just did it by speed of movement and trial and error and pre-computing one move ahead. I could never go ahead more than +1 move.
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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby CelticRose » Sun May 24, 2009 3:54 pm

My poor brain would take ages deciding which piece to move next. :lol:
Be who you are & say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter & those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss

I yam what I yam. - Popeye

Be yourself no matter what they say. - Sting

My blog: http://rainbowpincushion.blogspot.com/

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alin0s
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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby alin0s » Sun May 24, 2009 8:53 pm

CelticRose wrote:My poor brain would take ages deciding which piece to move next. :lol:


That was also a problem for me. Especially on the last one where I just couldn't figure the damn thing out. :P
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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby Sartresue » Mon Jul 13, 2009 5:56 pm

Thoroughly modern aspie topic

I love emoticons. I wish people in real life could be so animated, especially the hugs. :huggles:

I have always been verbal, but I have volunteered with those who are verbally challenged and i remember the cards.

Did you use them, Alin0s?

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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby alin0s » Mon Jul 13, 2009 6:02 pm

Sartresue wrote:Thoroughly modern aspie topic

I love emoticons. I wish people in real life could be so animated, especially the hugs. :huggles:

I have always been verbal, but I have volunteered with those who are verbally challenged and i remember the cards.

Did you use them, Alin0s?


Back when I was in school I Had a small keychain with PECS (Picture Exchange Communication System) cards for when I would go non verbal.

Funny that they JUST dxed me as Classic Autism JUST NOW. :bounce: :bounce: :lolfloor:
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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby pigeon309 » Fri Jul 17, 2009 5:42 pm

Aah...I think a kid in my old school had those picture cards. For me, emoticons have good and bad points. They're good to convey certain moods and clarify if you're being serious or joking, but sometimes I have trouble understanding what some are supposed to mean. It's a good thing they tell you when you roll the mouse over them, because, for example, tome, :? looks angry or sarcastic, but apparently, it's confused.
I'm abnormal, just like everyone else.

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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby MissConstrue » Sun Aug 02, 2009 11:06 pm

That's funny strapples because I feel the same way and I'm not autistic...well I'm on the autistic spectrum but as a child I struggled in verbalizing what I wanted to say. We didn't have cards so I'd draw pictures to my teacher of some of the things I had trouble naming or wanting to communicate. This was way way way before I had been diagnosed with aspergers or autism of any kind. It was something I really struggled in school with an no one including the docs could figure it out. Yet here there are people older than me that were diagnosed early in childhood..... :(

As for emoticans....Yes I have a huge addiction to them. I feel they are the better than how I express my words as I often have people misunderstand what I'm communicating.

I collect so many....they're in my junkyard collection... :twisted:
Oh you can't help that. We're all mad here.
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alin0s
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Re: Emoticons, the picture cards to the modern autistic?

Postby alin0s » Tue Aug 04, 2009 11:16 pm

MissConstrue wrote:That's funny strapples because I feel the same way and I'm not autistic...well I'm on the autistic spectrum but as a child I struggled in verbalizing what I wanted to say. We didn't have cards so I'd draw pictures to my teacher of some of the things I had trouble naming or wanting to communicate. This was way way way before I had been diagnosed with aspergers or autism of any kind. It was something I really struggled in school with an no one including the docs could figure it out. Yet here there are people older than me that were diagnosed early in childhood..... :(

As for emoticans....Yes I have a huge addiction to them. I feel they are the better than how I express my words as I often have people misunderstand what I'm communicating.

I collect so many....they're in my junkyard collection... :twisted:


if you want any added to the server PM them to me!
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